You’ve probably seen divorces on television that end up being litigated in the courtroom, in front of a judge. Those cases do happen, but there is an opportunity for your case to go a different route. If you and your spouse aren’t keen on taking your case to court, then you may want to consider mediation instead. 

Divorce mediation is often misunderstood as a kind of marital counseling. It’s not that at all. Instead, it’s a way that you and your spouse can work through disputes and factors involved in your case, such as property division or child custody concerns. You’ll work collaboratively to try to resolve your disputes with the help of a third-party mediator. 

The mediator is there to guide you, not to give you an answer. Your mediator understands the laws and can help you understand how certain choices may impact your case. Your mediator will not make decisions for you or try to push you toward one solution. Their guidance is meant to reduce conflict and to maintain a working environment where you and your spouse can both find a solution that’s fair.

Mediation can be helpful if you and your spouse are both willing to come together to negotiate. It is usually less expensive than building a case and going to trial, and it can be much faster. Keep in mind that it may take multiple sessions before you’ll come to an agreement, but that’s a reasonable expectation. You and your attorneys will be able to draw up the agreement immediately once it’s decided upon, so you and your spouse can review it and sign. 

Our website has more information on divorcing and what you can do to resolve any disputes that arise.